Health Care : NPR

Health Care : NPR

Health Care The state of health care, health insurance, new medical research, disease prevention, and drug treatments. Interviews, news, and commentary from NPR’s correspondents. Subscribe to podcasts.

“It was certainly expected that nursing homes would be hit but it was not inevitable that they’d be hit this hard,” Richard Mollot, executive director of New York-based Long Term Care Community Coalition, told NPR.

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As part of a demonstration across from the White House on May 7, National Nurses United set out empty shoes for nurses who have died from COVID-19. The union is asking employers and the government to provide safe workplaces, including adequate staffing. Hospitals have been laying off and furloughing nurses due to lost revenue.

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As Hospitals Lose Revenue, More Than A Million Health Care Workers Lose Jobs

Emergency room physicians are seeing a drop in admissions for heart attacks and strokes. They worry patients who have delayed care may be sicker when they finally arrive in emergency rooms.

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Eerie Emptiness Of ERs Worries Doctors: Where Are The Heart Attacks And Strokes?

Malaria Consortium providing antimalarial pills in Burkina Faso.

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Sophie Garcia/Malaria Consortium

The practice of palliative care is changing under the pandemic: Doctors and nurses are learning new ways to help patients and families communicate their treatment goals and make decisions about end-of-life care.

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Patients Dying Fast, And Far From Family, Challenge Practice Of Palliative Care

As millions of Americans have lost their jobs, Congress is trying to figure out what to do to help those who have also lost their health insurance.

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A member of the AltaMed Health Services staff prepares to take a sample at a drive-through coronavirus testing site in Los Angeles.

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Brian van der Brug/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Recently, millions of Americans have lost their jobs and, as a result, many are now looking for health insurance. NPR would like to know how you are searching.

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Photo Illustration by Max Posner/NPR

Protesters try to enter the chamber and are being kept out by police during a protest in Lansing, Mich., on Thursday.

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A pint of beer is poured at the 2015 Great British Beer Festival in London. A brewery in the northeast of England is giving away beer to help raise money for the National Health Service during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Plainfield Correctional Facility, an Indiana state prison southwest of Indianapolis, listed 89 cases of test-confirmed COVID-19 among inmates and four deaths from the illness, as of Thursday.

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Crowded Prisons Are Festering ‘Petri Dishes’ For Coronavirus, Observers Warn

Pedro Rivera waits with other volunteers in District Heights, Md. to hand out food. He’s wearing a mask that reads, “This too shall pass.”

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a news conference at the White House on April 16.

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An illustration shows spiky antigens studding the virus’s outer coat. Tests under development that look for these antigens might be faster than PCR tests for diagnosing COVID-19, proponents say. But the tests might still need PCR-test confirmation.

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A Next-Generation Coronavirus Test Raises Hopes And Concerns

A woman gets a novel coronavirus test in Los Angeles earlier this month. The City of Los Angeles, in partnership with Los Angeles County, will offer free coronavirus testing to all residents regardless of whether they have symptoms.

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

A booth was taped off to ensure social distancing at a coffee shop in Woodstock, Ga., on Monday, as Gov. Brian Kemp eased restrictions in the state and allowed dine-in service.

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Compared With China, U.S. Stay-At-Home Has Been ‘Giant Garden Party,’ Journalist Says

Doctors are urging parents to keep all their child’s vaccinations up to date — now, more than ever.

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Don’t Skip Your Child’s Well Check: Delays In Vaccines Could Add Up To Big Problems

From left: Maria Nakalanda, Edward Arineitwe and Charles Batte are Ugandan health-care workers who’ve had to rethink their commute after their country announced transportation restrictions.

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Maria Nakalanda; Edward Arineitwe; Charles Batte

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