HIPAA

What is HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) ?

HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) is United States legislation that provides data privacy and security provisions for safeguarding medical information. The law has emerged into greater prominence in recent years with the proliferation of health data breaches caused by cyberattacks and ransomware attacks on health insurers and providers.

The act, which was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on Aug. 21, 1996, contains five sections, or titles.

Title I: HIPAA Health Insurance Reform

Title I protects health insurance coverage for individuals who lose or change jobs. It also prohibits group health plans from denying coverage to individuals with specific diseases and pre-existing conditions, and from setting lifetime coverage limits.

Title II: HIPAA Administrative Simplification

Title II directs the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to establish national standards for processing electronic healthcare transactions. It also requires healthcare organizations to implement secure electronic access

Read More