medicine

Bighorn Medicine Wheel




On top of the Bighorn Range in Wyoming, a desolate 9,642 feet high and only
reachable during the warm summer months, lies an ancient Native American
construction — an 80′ diameter wheel-like pattern
made of stones. At the center
of the circle is a doughnut-shaped pile of stones, a cairn,
connected to the rim by 28 spoke-like lines of stones.
Six more stone cairns are arranged around the circle, most large enough
to hold a sitting human.
The central cairn is about 12 feet in diameter and 2′ high.

Medicine Wheel cairn




Map and Views of the Wheel and Mountain


The Medicine Wheel is located in the Bighorn Mountains in
Wyoming, USA, off highway 14A. Elevation: 9,642 feet.
Latitude: 44 degrees 49′ 32″ N.; longitude: 107 degrees 55′ 15″ W.



Bighorn Medicine Wheel

If you stand or
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Popular heartburn medicine being studied as treatment for coronavirus

Over the past few weeks researchers have been discreetly studying a new potential treatment for COVID-19 — and it might not be what you expect.

The treatment in question is called famotidine, and it’s the active ingredient in Pepcid, an over-the-counter medication commonly used to alleviate heartburn.

Since March 13, researchers at Northwell Health, a network of hospitals in New York, have been enrolling patients hospitalized with COVID-19 into their study of famotidine, which is being delivered through an IV in megadoses nine times greater than the typical over-the-counter dose. The drug is being given in combination with the much-touted antimalarial hydroxychloroquine.

Researchers said some data on safety will be available “in a few weeks,” but did not say when data will be available showing whether the drug combination is effective.

Dr. Kevin Tracey, CEO and president of the Feinsteins Institute for Medical Research at Northwell Health, says the study

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Institute for Personalized Medicine – Penn State College of Medicine Research

Medicine has always been personalized – what has changed are the tools available that allow medical professionals to provide better care for those with specific conditions. The Institute for Personalized Medicine is Penn State College of Medicine’s commitment to advancing health care for the community through the use of modern technology and more effective tools.

In the past, doctors based treatments on research that studied broad groups of people, finding what was most likely to help a majority of patients. While this approach has been successful, it’s not always efficient, since each person is different. Genetics and biology are unique to the individual, so treatments that work best for one person may not work best for another.

Personalized medicine is the use of individual characteristics to tailor treatments to the person. For example, one person may respond to a medicine differently than another because of their genetics. By knowing

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Home: Department of Family & Community Medicine: Feinberg School of Medicine: Northwestern University

Why Choose Family Medicine?

Family medicine physicians provide comprehensive, continuous healthcare to all members of the family throughout the course of their lives. By building relationships based on communication and respect, these physicians gain a deeper understanding of the whole person, including the range of physical, emotional and socioeconomic factors that influence a person’s health status.

The Department of Family & Community Medicine integrates biological, clinical and behavioral sciences to train our physicians to provide outstanding levels of patient-centered and culturally appropriate care.

Learn More

Education

Faculty Spotlight




See All Faculty

John L Gatta

Clinical Associate Professor of Family and Community Medicine

Dr. Gatta is a quanitative methodologist, specializing in building capacity within organizations to engage in research, evaluation, and quality improvement efforts. He is the Director of Research for the Department of Family & Community Medicine, and serves as course director for intermediate and advanced biostatistics courses offered

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About Naturopathic Medicine | Bastyr University

Naturopathic doctors are licensed or registered as health care providers in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Oregon, Utah, Vermont, Washington and the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Legal provisions allow the practice of naturopathic medicine in several other states. Naturopathic doctors are also recognized in Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan.

Efforts to gain licensure elsewhere are currently under way. Forty-two states and territories in the United States have professional associations for naturopathic medicine. Canada has 11 provincial and territorial professional associations.

States that legally recognize naturopathic medicine (in blue):

Map of U.S. states that license naturopathic medicine

Licensure Requirements for Naturopathic Doctors

All states and provinces with licensure laws require a resident course of at least four years and 4,100 hours of study from a college or university recognized by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education

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Health Medicine Center – Home Page

 


The Health Medicine Center office
will be closed temporarily starting
Friday, April 10, 2020 and will open
when the COVID-19 shelter-in-place
order has ended.

We will update you via email and on
our office voice mail about the
exact time when our office will be
open again. During this time, Dr.
Saputo will
be available for teleconferencing
and for special problems as needed,
and as he can. You can reach me by
email at

healthmedicine@comcast.net
to
schedule an urgent teleconference
with me, or for other health related
questions you might have.

If, for any reason, you have an
emergency
and cannot reach Dr. Saputo, please call
911,
or go to the nearest Urgent Care
Center
or Emergency Room.


Meanwhile, please stay safe and
healthy.
Len Saputo, MD, Tiffany Baer, MD



Continue reading for COVID-19
recommendations

 
“We embrace the
outer journey that primarily involves relief, or curing,
of physical symptoms
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The Society of Occupational Medicine

The SOM is the largest nationally recognised professional organisation for individuals with an interest in health and work. SOM acts as a national voice for occupational health, engaging with government and policy makers to increase awareness of the role of occupational health. Our Patrons are Lord Blunkett, Dame Carol Black and Sir Norman Lamb.

Membership is for anyone working, or with a professional interest, in occupational health. Members are multidisciplinary, and include doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, technicians, and psychologists. A SOM member is also a member of one of our 10 regional groups, enabling local networking with colleagues.

Our membership booklet outlines the benefits of joining the SOM. Members receive our peer reviewed scientific journal Occupational Medicine, an invaluable resource. They also benefit from career development opportunities, with information about the latest OH Jobs and Events. SOM members receive regular, practical, support and guidance, including a free legal helpline,

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Family Medicine RCR

 

To help family medicine residency programs quickly adjust clinical and educational practices to address COVID-19, AFMRD and STFM are offering this resource, which includes curricula for more than 200 family medicine topics,  to all family medicine residency programs. Curricula can be used for didactic in-person or virtual presentations. Keep in mind that if you share the login information with your residents, they will have access to the answers to the quizzes. Current paid subscribers will receive a 2-month extension.

Sign up and receive log-in information now

About the Family Medicine Residency Curriculum Resource

The Family Medicine Residency Curriculum Resource houses more than 200 peer-reviewed, case-based presentations, quizzes, and facilitators’ guides for family medicine education. Subscribe now to begin using the resources.

You must log in with your residency program’s group username and password to access the curriculum.

You can log in with your AFMRD or STFM username and password to

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Health & Medicine | (e) Science News

Polymers attack superbugs.

Using archival documents, a new report published online by JAMA
Internal Medicine
examines the sugar industry’s role in
coronary heart disease research and suggests the industry sponsored
research to influence…

This is a magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the fetal brain in a Zika virus infected primate. The large white region is abnormal and indicates an accumulation of fluid in the brain.For the first time, abnormal brain development following a Zika infection during pregnancy has been documented experimentally in the offspring of a non-human primate.

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This year, the U.S. reported for the first time that a patient had
been infected by bacteria resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of
last resort. The announcement followed several years…

Related science article

Current smokers experienced steeper FEV1 decline than former smokers.Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or
COPD, are associated with significant long-term lung function loss,
according to research published online, ahead of print in the
American Thoracic Society’s…

Related science article

More people are eating gluten-free, although the prevalence of celiac disease appears to have remained stable in recent years, according to an article published online by JAMA

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Explaining Traditional Chinese Medicine | HowStuffWorks

Traditional Chinese medicine is an ancient practice still used by millions of people all over the world — even after the development of modern scientific medicine.

At the root of traditional Chinese medicine is the belief that the individual (microcosm) is viewed as an integral part of the forces of nature (macrocosm). By careful observation of nature, Taoist sages were able to perceive patterns common to both the external environment and the internal climate of the human body. Over a period of thousands of years, the cumulative observations of sages all over China led to an intricate system of diagnosis and healing.

These traditional Chinese ancient remedies have more than withstood the tests of time — they have passed the tests of modern medicine. The links at the bottom of this page will take you to articles that explain the theories and practice of traditional Chinese medicine. Explore the history

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